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Services for children

This page answers the following questions:

What services are there available if my child has a neurological condition?
How does my child get extra educational help?
How can parents ensure their child’s needs are met?

What services are available if my child has a neurological condition?

A number of neurological conditions are present from birth and others arise in childhood. Your child has the same rights to appropriate health, social and educational services as everyone else. The medical professionals treating your child are most likely to specialise in treating children. This is known as paediatric care. In some areas there are also specialist facilities for children, for example child development centres. These will assess your child’s development needs and help provide co-ordinated family support from health, social and education services.

Many neurological conditions will mean that a child will be covered by the legal definition of ‘disability’ entitling them to be considered for additional services. Your child is entitled to be assessed by social services at any age in order to establish what services can be provided for you and your child, for example, practical assistance at home or home adaptations. If it is agreed that services are needed, children’s social services will draw up a care plan. This summarises the services to be provided. You will be given a copy of this and it should be reviewed by children’s services every year.

How does my child get extra educational help?

If you think that your child has special educational needs (SEN) you should talk to their early years education setting/school about your concerns. You can ask your local education authority to carry out an SEN assessment which could lead to your child having a Statement of their SEN and the extra help needed to meet their needs. For disabled children, schools must make reasonable adjustments to allow the child to be included.

How can parents ensure their child’s needs are met?

You know your child best and your views, as well as those of your child, should be listened to and taken into account. You can contact the sources of advice and/or the association which covers your child’s condition (see section 3) for further help and information.

Next: Concerns about care

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